After America’s independence in 1776, states like Nevada began to adopt their own official state seal, motto, nickname, and more, which are all used to symbolize and represent the uniqueness of each state and what they stand for.

When was Nevada’s state seal adopted? The first description of the features to be placed on Nevada’s state seal took place in 1864. Shortly after this, the seal was officially adopted.

The official state seal of Nevada displays many symbols that best describe the state’s rich history. Mineral resources are represented by a miner mining for silver, with a team of miners moving a car full of ore from a mountain that features on the left-hand side. A quartz mill can be seen standing at the base of the other mountain that appears on the right-hand side of the seal.

Nevada state seal

What is The Nevada State Seal?

The train and telegraph poles that feature in the middle of the state seal are symbols for both transportation and communication. In the foreground you can see a sheaf of wheat, a sickle, and a plow, which are all used to showcase the agricultural history that is deep-seated within the state.

Nevada is incredibly well-known for its abundnance of natural beauty, which is represented by the shining sunrise over mountain peaks. The inner circle of the famous seal shows the official state motto “All for Our Country”, with 36 stars. These 36 stars show that Nevada was the 36th state to officially enter the union. On the outer circle you can see “The Great Seal of the State of Nevada”.

Most states will have their seals showcase a relevant story, that is indicative of the state and its history, and this fact about the Silver State puts its history and what it stands for across very well in its state seal. The Great Seal of the State of Nevada is a vivid symbol of all that is special about the state!