Some of the things that make the U.S unique is the fact that it is made up of 50 individual States, all with their own laws, widely varying climates, landscapes, and cultures.

Each state has its own nickname usually derived from an event associated with its historical past, a notable landmark within the State, a cultural icon, or even the weather. Florida’s nickname, as you may have guessed, is associated with its weather!

Florida's Nickname

What is Florida’s nickname? It is The Sunshine State.

The Sunshine State is on the South-East coast of America, with the Atlantic Ocean on the east side and the Gulf of Mexico on the west coast.




Florida’s nickname was officially adopted in 1970 by the Florida legislature. However, it isn’t the only Florida nickname; it is also (less commonly) known as the peninsula or “Big Bend” State because of its location and shape. Florida’s motto is “In God We Trust.”

Florida’s State Nickname

Florida is widely known for its tropical climate, hundreds of miles of amazing beaches, and the most golf courses of any American State. If you are curious to learn more interesting facts about Florida, we have compiled some amazing state facts, many that you probably didn’t know about! One of those interesting facts is that Florida is home to the most golf courses out of any other US state, 1,300, and counting!

has over 100,000 earthquakes each year. We think you’ll find all these facts about the state and its economy very interesting!

Florida’s State Nickname reflects that it has on average 300 days of sunshine a year and because of this produces the most oranges in America. Florida’s State nickname was adopted 125 years after it was admitted as the 27th State of America in 1845.

The Sunshine State is a very appropriate nickname and it is widely used in a variety of marketing materials and by tourism-related companies to draw people to the state and its outdoor-living climate.

If you are interested in learning about the Florida state abbreviation, take a look at our page dedicated to this.