A state symbol can come in the form of state animals, mammals, a state bird and flower, amphibians, nicknames, state seals, and much more.

State symbols were adopted by states to best represent them and their historical roots, their geological makeup, their past and present successes, and the ecosystem and habitats that make up the state. Like all other states, there are many Colorado state symbols.

What is the State Animal of Colorado?

Colorado’s state animal is the Rocky Mountain bighorn sheep (Ovis canadensis). The Rocky Mountain bighorn sheep has officially been the state animal of Colorado since 1961.

These sheep are truly awesome to look at and totally unique when compared with other species, and, despite having such large curling horns that can grow to an incredible 50 inches in length, their balance is incredible.

You will typically find these sheep residing within extremely rugged terrain, near or on the Rocky Mountains, and, unlike deer and elk, their horns will continuously grow throughout their life, with some known to weigh as much as 30 lbs!

State animal of Colorado

There are officially fewer than 45,000 bighorn sheep throughout the western United States and Canada, they reside in small herds, isolated in the valleys of states and regions. Unfortunately, the Rocky Mountain bighorn sheep are endangered which has been caused by uncontrolled hunting. Today, it is totally illegal to pursue, take, hunt, injure, or kill the Rocky Mountain bighorn sheep, unless exempt by law.

Most states will have their symbols showcase a relevant story, that is indicative of the state and its history, and the Centennial State puts its history and what it stands for across very well in its state animal. This interesting fact about Colorado and a whole host of others are what makes the state so unique and fascinating to those that live there or are researching the historical events of the state and its symbols.