Shortly after 1776, states began to adopt their own official state seals, mottos, nicknames, and much more, which are all used to symbolize and represent the uniqueness of each U.S. state.

So, what is Indiana’s famous state seal? Indiana’s state seal was originally adopted for the 1816 and 1851 Indiana constitutions, and it wasn’t until 1963 that a full description was provided and it was officially adopted as Indiana’s state seal by the Indiana General Assembly. Additionally, versions of the pioneer scene that you can see on the seal date back as far as 1801!

Indiana state seal

What Does The State Seal Of Indiana Mean?

The design of the famous Indiana state seal is a woodsman chopping down a tree with an axe, a buffalo jumping over a fallen tree, sycamore trees, hills in the background, and a sun setting with 14 rays.

The tree is a tulip poplar, and its leaves border diamond shapes in the outer circle. You can also see the words “Seal of the state of Indiana” draped around the outer circle. Additionally, the significant date that Indiana entered the union appears at the bottom (1816).

Most states will have their seals showcase a relevant story, that is indicative of the state and its history, and the Hoosier State is certainly no different.

Official U.S. Seal

The Indiana State Seal is different to the official U.S. seal, and on June 20, 1782, the nation’s state seal was finally approved by the Continental Congress, after a committee was first created to design the seal on July 4, 1776.

Nearly six years and four designs later, the U.S. seal uses an eagle that holds a scroll in its beak with the E Pluribus Unum motto; in one claw is an olive branch, a symbol of peace, and the other claw holds thirteen arrows, a symbol of war. The seal is used on many official documents and is separate and distinct of the seals that each U.S. state have.