Some of the things that make the United States unique is the fact that it is made up of 50 individual States, all with their own laws, widely varying climates, landscapes, and cultures.

All these factors culminate into several interesting facts about Hawaii, with one of the more notable ones being that you can mail a coconut from Hawaii, just simply a coconut with no packaging or anything other than the address, of course!

Each state has its own nickname usually derived from an event associated with its historical past, a notable landmark within the State, or a cultural icon. Let’s consider Hawaii’s nickname.

Hawaii's Nickname

What is Hawaii’s Nickname? It is the Aloha State.

Hawaii, the Aloha State, is a cluster of islands in the Pacific Ocean and is the only US State located outside of North America, as well as being the only island state.




If you are interested in seeing the Nicknames for states in the US (all 50 of them), including the date each state was entered into the Union, then head over to our page that lists them in alphabetical order.

Hawaii’s nickname originates from the native language of the Hawaiian people, also known as Kanaka Maoli who settled in Hawaii around the 5th Century AD and were of Polynesian descent. The word “Aloha” is used by Hawaiians as a greeting or parting phrase, it can also mean love and affection and has been widely associated with Hawaii for many years.

Hawaii State Nickname

Aloha – the famous greeting associated with the State of Hawaii has also been used for many years across the globe. The Hawaii State Nickname was immortalized in a famous song written by Queen Lili’uokalani when she was the Princess of the Hawaiian kingdom.

Some people believe that the island of Hawaii was named after Hawaii Loa – the Polynesian who discovered the islands. Others think the name may have come from Hawaiki, the original home of the Polynesian’s before they were dispersed across Polynesia.

The Hawaii State Nickname was established after it became the 50th state of the U.S. in 1959. It was the last state to be admitted into the United States of America by a formal ceremony marking the transfer of the Hawaiian State Sovereignty to the United States.

It was held on the 12th August 1959 on the steps of the Iolani Palace in Honolulu when the Hawaiian flag was lowered and the American flag was raised. President Eisenhower signed the proclamation.

Despite Hawaii’s nickname being a part of a little known and spoken language around the world, it has become a global symbol of friendship and greeting associated with America’s 50th State. If you are interested in learning about the Hawaii state abbreviation, take a look at our page dedicated to this.