After the U.S. declared its official independence, many things began to change, and a new historical chapter started to take place in the United States.

Shortly after America’s independence in 1776, states like Connecticut began to adopt their own official state seal, motto, nicknames, and much more, which are all used to symbolize and represent the uniqueness of each state and what they stand for.

So, what does the Connecticut state seal represent? The original seal of the Colony of Connecticut had 15 grapevines. It was initially brought from England back in 1639 by Colonel George Fenwick and it was used as the seal of the Saybrook Colony, which was established in 1635 at the very mouth of the Connecticut River, in Old Saybrook, Connecticut.

After the Connecticut Colony dispersed in 1687, almost 100 years later in 1775 the official state seal that we know today was created.

Connecticut state seal

State Seal Of Connecticut

The state seal of Connecticut features a trio of grape vines. Underneath the grape vines is a banner with the official state motto reading: “Sustinet Qui Transtulit” (Latin for He who is transplanted still sustains). Sigillum Reipublicae Connecticutensis is Latin and translates to “Seal of the State of Connecticut”.

Most states will have their seals showcase a relevant story, that is indicative of the state and its history, and the Constitution State is certainly no different.

The U.S. State Seal

The official seal of the United States is different than the Connecticut state seal and it was finally approved by the Continental Congress, after a committee was first created to design the seal on July 4, 1776. Nearly six years and four designs later, the U.S. seal uses an eagle that holds a scroll in its beak with the E Pluribus Unum motto; in one claw is an olive branch, a symbol of peace, and the other claw holds thirteen arrows, a symbol of war. The seal is used on many official documents.