The Arkansas state animal is the White-Tailed Deer (Odocoileus virginianus) and was adopted by the state to best represent its historical roots and past and present wildlife. Many other state symbols represent Arkansas, such as nicknames, state seals, trees, cakes, flowers, birds, insects, and more.

What is the Arkansas State Mammal?

The majestic and beautiful white-tailed deer has been the state animal to represent Arkansas since 1993. Arkansas, like many other states, identifies the white-tailed deer as their official state mammal rather than state animal.

These glorious animals possess an abundance of power and agility, running at speeds of up to 40 mph, jumping over 9 feet in the air, and swimming at around 13 mph! Their snow-white tails act as both a warning sign for others when danger is sensed and also as a distraction and to confuse predators when being chased.

Arkansas state animal

The fawns (baby deers) are typically born with many white spots covering their bodies, this is for camouflage. In the olden days, both European settlers and Native Americans heavily relied on these deer for their buckskin and as a crucial source of food.

Arkansas State Animal Facts

The white-tailed deer is the most popular state animal among all U.S. states, with 10 other states adopting this stunning creature as their state mammal or state animal. The other states that recognized the white-tailed deer as their state animal are Illinois, Michigan, Mississippi, Nebraska, New Hampshire, Ohio, Oklahoma, Pennsylvania, South Carolina, and Wisconsin. Today, there are an estimated 30 million white-tailed deer residing in the United States.

Quick Facts about the White-Tailed Deer

  • White-tailed deer are the most popular big game animal in the United States.
  • The majority of white-tailed deer will live anywhere between 2 to 3 years, with their maximum lifespan in the wild being 20 years, However, most will not surpass 10 years of age due to predators, deforestation, and environmental issues.
  • Baby white-tail deer (Fawns) eat only their mother’s milk for two weeks after birth, and they are herbivores, so once weaned they will eat primarily leaves, twigs, and other greens.
  • While baby deers are commonly referred to as fawns, the adults are called bucks.
  • The males shed and regrow their antlers once every year.
  • They are fantastic swimmers, which is a tactic they use to escape predators, by swimming quickly across rivers and streams.

Most states have their symbols showcase a relevant story, that is indicative of the state and its history, its geological makeup and its wildlife and The Natural State puts its history and what it stands for across very well in its state animal. This interesting fact about Arkansas and a whole host of others are what makes the state so unique and fascinating to those that live there or are researching the historical events of the state.