A few years after the nation declared its official independence, many things within the United States started to change, and a new historical chapter began in the U.S.

On June 20, 1782, the nation’s official state seal was initially created, and was adopted by the Continental Congress of America. The Great Seal of the U.S. is used as the symbol of sovereignty as a nation.

Shortly after this, states began adopting their own official state seals, mottos, nicknames, and much more, which are used to symbolize and represent the uniqueness of each US state.

Arizona state seal

Arizona’s official state seal is symbolic of the state’s rich history and displays the state’s main enterprises, natural resources, and attractions. All of these have contributed to the state becoming the Arizona we know and love today.

Great Seal of the State of Arizona

So, what does the Arizona state seal represent? The official great seal of the state of Arizona that is used and can be found on official documentation is actually in black and white. However, the seal that people are accustomed to is in color.

The actual design of the seal displays a background mountain range with the sunrise creeping in between the peaks, a storage reservoir and a dam, fields, and orchards to showcase agriculture, cattle grazing, and a quartz mill with a minor holding a pickaxe and a shovel.

Above the scene that has been created on the seal you can see the state motto; “Ditat Deus”. This Latin phrase translates to “God Enriches”. You can also find the words “Great Seal of the State of Arizona” and the year that the state was admitted to the union (1912), subsequently becoming the 48th state to make up the United States.

Most states will have their seals showcase a relevant story, that is indicative of the state and its history, and the Grand Canyon State is certainly no different.